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Insulin Dispenser Case 

Designing and Adapting to User Needs.

My client was Josh, the father of a 20-month old child with Type-1 Diabetes. The autoimmune disorder requires constant attention from Josh and his wife, because their son is not yet old enough to be responsible for his own health.

I designed a case that can help Josh and his wife quickly identify between two different types of insulin, which needs to be taken during different times of the day.

 

The case includes two different containers which can be combined and separated easily by embedded magnets. A red cap covers one of the containers to represent the long-lasting insulin spot. Decorative monkeys were placed on the case to provide a kid-friendly theme for Josh's son.

Objective

Overview

Insulin Dispenser Case

Project

Class

Team

Period

Skills

Introduction to Design (MIT Course #: 2.00)

Team of 4

Nov - Dec 2016

Defining design problems/user needs, Human-Centered Design, Evaluating/Communicating Designs, Sketching, Prototyping, SolidWorks - CAD

Iterations of this product was done through various methods and materials. Foam core and blue foam were used to quickly test out correct dimensions for the product. Critical dimensions included housings for the insulin bottles. Foam core is very stiff so it was very easy to have it be our starting material to hold the insulin bottles.

Blue foam allowed the prototyping process to be very flexible since it could be cut and melted away anywhere and in any orientation. This was especially useful when testing out different lid/cap mechanisms since most of the mechanisms had shapes that were more organic and rounded. Below are the different progressions of prototypes.

Approach

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During the prototyping phase, I was able to interview and visit our client's home to bring a different perspective into the design process. In the initial interview, our team asked our user to casually talk us through his day. The following week, our team made a trip out to the user's house to observe his actions and receive information through a different outlet without bias. Traits that our team used many times and used as our mantra were "simple" and "easy-to-use."

User-Testing

Finalized

Design

The finalized design was done using 3D printing to provide precise measurements. The insulin bottle case was a combination of two containers to hold two different types of insulin. They also contained embedded magnets so that the containers could stay together. 

 

A thinner filament was used for higher accuracy, and the accuracy of 3D printing allowed for magnets to be press fit into place inside the cases without the use of any adhesives. 3D printing's accuracy also allowed a metal hinge to be in-bedded in one of the containers and the red cap. Press fitting allows for faster assembly and also use of less resources. 

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Magnet Embedded

Magnet Embedded

Assortment

Assortment

Separated

Separated

Front View Open

Front View Open

Front View Closed

Front View Closed

Side View Open

Side View Open

Bottles

Bottles

Side View Closed

Side View Closed